Home News Mexican Independence Parade in Los Angeles Strengthens Cultural Roots

Mexican Independence Parade in Los Angeles Strengthens Cultural Roots

Mexican independence parade in Los Angeles strengthens cultural roots. The organizer “of the largest parade of independence in the United States, since 1946” recalled that in the middle of the 20th century many Mexican-Americans did not speak Spanish well and distanced themselves from their Latin culture “for fear of being mistreated”, a product of racism

Mexican Independence Parade
“Young people born in the country get excited when they hear a ‘¡Viva México!'”

Mexicans celebrated today the seventy-second edition of the Mexican Independence Day Parade in East Los Angeles with the traditional cultural festival that organizers assure help to “strengthen Latin cultural roots” and expand them among the youngest.

” Celebrating Mexico’s independence in the United States is important because with it our new generations learn from our roots, ” Maria Elena Serrano, president of the Civic Patriotic Committee.

The parades of independence celebrated by immigrants and Americans of Mexican roots “have an educational effect on the population,” he added.

The organizer of “the largest parade of independence in the United Statessince 1946 ” recalled that in the mid-twentieth century many Mexican-Americans did not speak Spanish well and distanced themselves from their Latino culture “for fear of being mistreated,” product of racism.

However, celebrations like today are attended by tens of thousands of people on the streets where “young people born in the country get excited when they hear a ‘¡Viva México!'”, Stressed Serrano.

The walking party, entitled “Let’s travel together through Mexico”, started at the intersection of Calle Mednik and Avenida César Chávez with the song “México Lindo y Querido“, sung by the Mariachi Ecos de Atengo.

People crowded on the sidewalks celebrated the passage of 120 contingents with floats, groups of “Mexican charros” on horseback, musical bands, folk dances, and mariachis, among others.

The immigrants thus taught the younger ones that the independence movement of Mexico from Spain began with the subversive “Grito” in Dolores, Guanajuato, promulgated by the priest Miguel Hidalgo at dawn on September 16, 1810.

They remembered that Spain accepted to leave Mexico as a “free” country 11 years later, and the Mexican territory included California, annexed to the United States in 1847, where today in the city of Angelo, “emancipation” is a festive occasion.

The parade queen, Erika Aifan, the guest actor as Grand Mariscal, Armando Silvestre, among others, drove on floating platforms.

Monica Rodriguez, municipal councilor of the 7th district of Los Angeles, told that Mexican immigrants and those born in the country collectively show that “we are united as a community.”

The annual party “means to demonstrate who we are and thus claim all the respect we deserve,” said the representative of the San Fernando Valley.

The daughter of Mexican immigrants stressed that she is aware that because she was born in California she has “lost a lot of her Mexican culture”, which is why she supports all Latin celebrations, so that children, like their children, grow up with greater wealth cultural and languages.

“What makes this country unique is that it is made of different cultures, Latins are a big group, so we need to preserve all our celebrations,” said Rodriguez.

Allison Gómez, the violinist of the mariachi Ecos de Atengo, told that the 19 members and directors traveled from the Mexican state of Jalisco to participate in the parade.

“It gives me great joy to celebrate the national holidays in the United States and bring a little bit of Mexico to people who can not visit the country,” Gomez said.

“We feel so good to be together with Mexicans who live here, with people from other countries, that we feel that together we are making a great partnership,” he concluded.

 

You may also like

Load More Related Articles
Load More In News

Check Also

At least six dead in the magnitude 7.5 earthquake in southern Mexico

Earthquake in Southern Mexico: The 7.5 -magnitude earthquake that shook central and southe…