Hurricane Florence Could Be Further Strengthened to the Southeast of the US

Hurricane Florence Could Be Further Strengthened to the Southeast of the US. The bulletin of the National Hurricane Center of 8 pm on Tuesday night, Miami time, confirmed that Florence maintains a maximum sustained speed of 140 miles per hour and is expected to “strengthen even more”

  • Florence is expected to “be an extremely dangerous major hurricane until it hits land” at some point probably off the coast of North Carolina, the NHC warned.

  • The dangerous storm surge will cause areas that are normally dry near the coast to be “flooded by an increase in sea level” that could reach between 9 and 13 feet in height.

Hurricane Florence
Florence’s vortex will move through the southwest Atlantic between Bermuda and the Bahamas until Wednesday and will approach the coast of North Carolina or South Carolina on Friday.

The “extremely dangerous” hurricane Florence, category 4, maintains its strength, size, and organization on its way to the states of Carolina del Norte and del Sur, on the southeast coast of the US, where it threatens, among others, a storm surge.

Hurricane Florence Could Be Further Strengthened

The National Hurricane Center (NHC), based in Miami, indicated in its 8:00 pm local time bulletin that Florence is 350 miles (565 kilometers) south-southwest of Bermuda and 725 miles (1,165 kilometers) east-southeast of Cape Fear, in North Carolina.

He noted that Florence maintains a maximum sustained speed of 140 miles per hour (220 km / h) and is expected to “further strengthen and continue this trend of intensification slowly the next 24 hours.”

For this reason, the system is expected to “be an extremely dangerous major hurricane until it hits land ” at some point probably off the coast of North Carolina, warned the NHC, based in Miami.

According to a probable trajectory pattern, Florence’s vortex will move through the southwest Atlantic between Bermuda and the Bahamas until tomorrow, Wednesday, and will approach the coast of North Carolina or South Carolina on Friday.

NHC experts warned of the possibility of the system generating a “storm surge that endangers human lives along the coasts of North Carolina and South Carolina.”

Florence moves at about 17 miles per hour (28 km / h) and is expected to slow down “considerably between Thursday afternoon and Friday,” the NHC said.

With the approach of Florence to the United States, the NHC issued a hurricane alert from South Santee River (South Carolina) to Duck, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (North Carolina).

A surveillance of storm surge is maintained in the area, where the NHC warns that “there is the possibility of life-threatening floods” due to an increase in sea level “moving inland” in the next 48 hours.

The dangerous storm surge will cause areas that are normally dry near the coast to be “flooded by an increase in sea level” that could reach between 9 and 13 feet (2.7 to 4 meters) in height from Cabo Fear to Cabo Lookout. , the meteorologists highlighted.

It is expected that Florence, moving west-northwest, will produce total rainfall accumulations of 15 to 25 inches (38-63 centimeters) with isolated amounts of 35 inches in areas (89 cm) of North Carolina, Virginia, and North of South Carolina until next Saturday.

“This rain could cause flash floods that threaten human life,” the NHC warned.

Meanwhile, Helene, of category 2, and Isaac, who demeaned on Tuesday from hurricane to tropical storm, continue their advance through Atlantic waters without representing the danger on land.

Helene is located 725 miles (1,170 kilometers) west of the Cape Verde Islands, on the northwest African coast, and 1,515 miles (2,435 kilometers) south-southwest of the Azores.

It carries maximum sustained winds of 105 miles per hour (165 km / h) and travels to the northwest with a speed of 12 miles per hour (19 km / h).

Helene will turn north-northwest as of next Wednesday and Thursday, the NHC said.

However, it will experience a “gradual weakening” in its passage through colder waters over the Atlantic from this night and could degrade to a tropical storm next Thursday.

The other system in the sights of meteorologists is Isaac, which carries maximum sustained winds of 70 miles per hour (110 km / h). It moves west and is 610 miles (980 kilometers) east of the Lesser Antilles.

It is expected that its center will travel near or over the central zone of the Lesser Antilles on Thursday, and then, in the evening, it will go to the eastern Caribbean.

NHC experts detailed that Isaac could “be close to becoming a hurricane again” as he moves through the center of the Lesser Antilles, with “some weakening” as of next Friday. ”

A hurricane watch has been issued for Guadeloupe, Martinique and Dominica and a tropical storm watch (system passage in 48 hours) for Antigua, Montserrat and San Cristobal and Nevis.

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