Government Asks Judge Decision on Temporary Suspension of Deportations

Judge Dana Sabraw had promised to adopt a resolution on the suspension of the expulsions, although he did not grant a specific deadline, and while the cessation of the deportations of reunified families remains in effect

Government Asks Judge Decision on Temporary Suspension of Deportations
View of a group of protesters against the deportation of immigrant families in the US.

The US government on Wednesday asked a federal judge for a prompt decision on the temporary suspension of deportations of reunified immigrant families, given that the order that the magistrate issued last month causes problems in federal agencies.

At a federal court hearing in San Diego, Judge Dana Sabraw promised to adopt a resolution on the suspension of the expulsions, although he did not grant a specific deadline and in the meantime the cessation of deportations of reunited families that had been separated at the border by the policy of “zero tolerance” against illegal immigration.

Sabraw, who sees the denunciation of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) against the government for family separation, ordered last month to suspend the expulsions of reunified families from the country.

Via telephone, government attorney Scott Stewart urged the judge to take a decision soon since the deportations were frozen space problems have accumulated and interfered with the operations of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

“They are dealing with riots in at least one of their facilities, where people want to be removed or released,” said the lawyer, who said the government’s plan is to deport these parents “as soon as practical

Sabraw ruled in June that the government reunify undocumented families separated at the border and set deadlines for children under five and another date for older children, which the government partially met.

The ACLU asked the magistrate not to sport the families within seven days of being reunited so that they will be given time to evaluate and receive guidance on their future options.

Stewart insisted that immigrants “have had enough time”, since the last deadline for reunifications was on July 26 and since then 13 days have passed in which to analyze their options.

Wednesday’s hearing, in which Sabraw heard arguments on this issue from lawyers from the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the ACLU, comes after a Columbia judge transferred a lawsuit to the San Diego court parallel on minors separated from their parents.

Both parties must submit a weekly progress report on Thursday on the reunification of families in which the father or mother is not in the country, and also return to court the next day.

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